Time Out Books: NZ Bestsellers

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For the week ending 27 March 2022

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FICTION

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1. The Fish by Lloyd Jones (Penguin)

The follow-up to The Cage, a 2019 Ockhams finalist, is original, lyrical and provocative, and (unsurprisingly) dividing critical opinion: see Vincent O’Sullivan at the Spinoff, Paula Morris at ReadingRoom, and Cait Kneller here at the ANZL.

 

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2. Greta & Valdin by Rebecca K.Reilly (VUP)

One of the four fiction titles shortlisted for the $60,000 Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction at the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards. Josie Shapiro describes it as about ‘the particular nuance of modern romance and the dynamics of an eccentric and worldly family’. Read her full review here.

 

 

3. Sorrow and Bliss by Meg Mason (HarperCollins)

Last week’s number one was longlisted for the 2021 Ockham’s and is currently longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction in the U.K. An exploration of inheritance, desire and forgiveness, it’s the ‘blisteringly funny’ story of tall, blonde, and brilliant Martha’ set from the mid 90s to 2017, ‘as she navigates life with an undiagnosed mental illness’ Josie Shapiro writes on Read Close.

 

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4. Auē by Becky Manawatu (Mākaro Press)

Another return to the charts for the winner of the Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction at the 2020 Ockham NZ Book Awards. Auē has been New Zealand’s best-selling novel for the past two years and continues to lure new readers. Rights were sold to the US, UK and Australia this June.

 

 

5. A Good Winter by Gigi Fenster (Text)

Another Ockhams fiction finalist soars into the number two spot. Winner of the 2020 Michael Gifkins Prize for an unpublished manuscript, A Good Winter is a tense psychological thriller about women’s relationships and dangerous obsessions. Listen to the Radio New Zealand review.

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NON FICTION

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1. Toi Tu Toi Ora by Nigel Borell (Penguin)

A visual stunner featuring work by 110 Māori artists, this is the print version of the landmark contemporary Māori art exhibition at Auckland Art Gallery/Toi o Tāmaki. The editor is that show’s curator, Nigel Borell, who includes 200+ works from the 50s on. (He’s now the curator of the Wairau Māori Art Gallery in the Hundertwasser Art Centre.) Read Kennedy Warne’s account of the exhibition for e-tangata.

 

2. Aroha by Hinemoa Elder (Penguin)

Published in 2020, this compendium of one-a-week whakatauki (proverbs) continues to strike a chord. Psychiatrist Elder (Te Aupōuri, Ngāti Kurī, Te Rarawa, Ngāpuhi) discusses happiness, leadership and community. Elder talks about scientific and cultural knowledge in this interview.

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3. Rich enough? A laid-back guide for every Kiwi by Mary Holm (HarperCollins)

The NZ Herald’s astute financial columnist gives clear, sensible advice on saving, investing, paying down debt, planning for retirementand not obsessing over getting rich. Hear her talk about ‘making the most of the money you have’ on Radio NZ.

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4. NUKU: Stories of 100 Indigenous Women by Qiane (Qiane + Co)

A finalist in the Illustrated Nonfiction category in this year’s Ockham NZ Book Awards, this beautiful book combines photography and first=person testimony to showcase indigenous women making a difference in politics, healthcare, business, education, sport and the arts. Read an interview about the multi-year project with Qiane at te ao Māori News.
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5. After the Tampa by Abbas Nazari (Allen and Unwin)

In 2001, Nazari was one of the hundreds of Afghan refugees rescued by the cargo ship the Tampa in the Indian Ocean. Eight years old and speaking no English when his family settled in New Zealand, Nazari became a Fulbright Scholar (and rugby player), his memoir a 2021 bestseller. See Nazari talk to Jack Tame on TVNZ about why we need to open our doors again to Afghanistan refugees.

 

 

'...poetry makes intimate everything that it touches.' - Michael Harlow

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