Time Out Books: NZ Bestsellers

For the week ending 6 March 2022

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FICTION

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1. Greta & Valdin by Rebecca K.Reilly (VUP)

Another strong week for one of the four fiction titles shortlisted for the $60,000 Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction at the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards. Josie Shapiro describes it as about ‘the particular nuance of modern romance and the dynamics of an eccentric and worldly family’ written with ‘biting observational humour.’ Read her full review here.

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2. Remember Me by Charity Norman (Allen & Unwin)

Some of crime writer Norman’s previous books have been finalists in the Ngaio Awards in New Zealand and the Ned Kelly Awards in Australia. This is her seventh novel, an atmospheric and suspenseful tale of a woman who returns home to New Zealand to care for her father, and uncover the secrets he’s beginning to reveal.
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3. Kurangaituki by Whiti Hereaka (Huia)

Also a finalist for the Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize, Hereaka’s first novel for adults was a decade in the making. A subversive, imaginative re-framing of the myth of the monster bird woman, Kurangaituki is an audacious structural feat. Hear Whiti discuss it on Radio New Zealand.

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4. The Bone People by Keri Hulme (Pan Macmillan)

The late Keri Hulme’s Booker-Prize winner from 1984 returns to the charts. Read Kelly Ana Morey’s farewell to Keri here.

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5. She’s a Killer by Kirsten McDougall (VUP)

McDougall’s third novel is a ‘lively, engaging and often hilarious satirical’ story set in a New Zealand where water is an expensive commodity, restaurants have armed guards, and ‘wealthugees’ buy up land. Read Philip Matthews’ full review here.

 

 

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NONFICTION

 

1. The Mirror Book by Charlotte Grimshaw (Vintage)

A return to #1 for the memoir sensation of last year, a General Nonfiction finalist in this year’s Ockham NZ Book Awards. A ‘fascinating portrait of not only a family, but the writing process. How we magpie material (go and make a story out of it) and what we build from itand at whose expense?’ Read Rachael King’s full review here.

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 2. Shifting Grounds: Deep Histories of Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland by Lucy Mackintosh (BWB)

A finalist in the Illustrated Nonfiction category at the Ockham NZ Book Awards, this is an exploration of the cultural histories of three of Auckland’s most iconic landscapes: Pukekawa (the Domain), Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill) and the Ōtuataua Stonefields at Ihumātao. Anna Rankin’s review for Metro includes photography by Haru Sameshima.

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3. The Accidental Teacher by Tim Heath (Allen & Unwin)

Heath’s memoir explores forty years of teaching in New Zealand and Samoa. ‘Heath is an anecdotalist, an accomplished teller of his own stories,’ Linda Burgess wrote in the Spinoff, describing the book as ‘supremely engaging.’

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4. Island Notes by Tim Higham (Cuba Press)

Subtitled ‘Finding my place on Aotea Great Barrier Island’, this book by accomplished science writer Higham is both memoir and history, as well a meditation on the island’s unique natural environment. See Sarah Ell’s review for Kete.

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5. Dancing with the Machine by Jo Morgan (Allen & Unwin)

Written with John McCrystal, this is the story of adventurer and avid motorcyclist Morgan. The focus is her attempt to climb all 24 of New Zealand’s 3000-metre-plus mountain peaks, with the help of guide and friend Wolfgang (nicknamed The Machine). Read an extract at Kete Books.

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