Anna Smaill

ANZL Member

Photo credit: Natalie Graham

 

Anna Smaill is a poet, novelist and violinist whose first novel The Chimes (Sceptre, 2015) was longlisted for the 2015 Man Booker Prize. ‘To call The Chimes striking,’ one reviewer wrote, ‘is to underplay what might be the most distinctive debut of the decade.’ The Sunday Star Times wrote that ‘Harpers Bazaar, Huffington Post and The Independent are all touting The Chimes as one the best books of 2015. With its imaginative rendition of future place and space, and absorbing cast and plot, it’s easy to see why’.

Anna’s first book of poetry, The Violinist in Spring (Victoria University Press, 2005) was listed as one of the Best Books of 2006 by the NZ Listener. Paola Bilbrough (New Zealand Books) described it as ‘a meditation on what it means to be alive’. In addition, Anna’s poetry has been published in various anthologies and journals, including Sport, Landfall and the NZ Listener.

Anna holds an MA in English Literature from the University of Auckland and an MA in Creative Writing from the International Institute of Modern Letters at Victoria University of Wellington. After completing her PhD at UCL, she lectured in Creative Writing at the University of Hertfordshire. In 2016, she was awarded Honorary Literary Fellow at the New Zealand Society of Authors Waitangi Day Honours. She has been a participant in a multitude of literary festivals both nationally and internationally.

She lives on Wellington’s south coast with her husband, novelist Carl Shuker, and their daughter.

Anna is currently working on her second novel.

 

 

Links

Anna Smaill’s website

New Zealand Book Council profile page

Review of The Chimes in The Guardian (2015)

Interview with James Kidd, Independent on Sunday (2015)

Review of The Chimes in The New Zealand Herald (2015)

Review of The Chimes on Tor.com (2015)

Bibliography: Anna Smaill

 

Poetry

The Violinist in Spring  (Victoria UP, 2005)

 

Fiction

The Chimes  (Quercus, New York (2016); Sceptre, London (2015); Alpha Books, Beijing (forthcoming))

 

'Character to some extent is much a construction of the reader as it is of the writer.' - Lloyd Jones

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