Cliff Fell

ANZL Member

Cliff Fell is a poet, musician, reviewer and broadcaster who was born in London to an English mother and New Zealand father. He is the author of three books of poems: The Adulterer’s Bible (Victoria University Press, 2003), Beauty of the Badlands (Victoria University Press, 2008), and a 156-line acrostic/alphabetary, The Good Husbandwoman’s Alphabet, an illustrated chapbook (Last Leaf Press, 2014). A number of his poems can be found online, notably in various Best New Zealand Poems anthologies and also the Griffith Review website. The New Zealand Poetry Society has described Cliff’s work as ‘ambitious, musical, and interesting’.

His first book The Adulterer’s Bible, received the 2002 Adam Prize in Creative Writing and the 2004 Jessie Mackay Prize for Best First Book of Poetry. His poem ‘Ophelia’ was named one of the Best New Zealand Poems (2003), ‘Ovid in the Antipodes’ (2006), ‘The M at the End of the Earth’ (2007), ‘Two L tt  s fo Lo d  uth  fo d’ (2008), ‘Secret Vita’ (2011), ‘Chagall in Vitebsk’ (2013) and ‘L’Anima Verde’ (2014).

Cliff has an MA in Creative Writing from Victoria University. In 2015 he was a Teaching Fellow at the International Institute of Modern Letter in Wellington, convening the MA workshop in Poetry and Non-fiction. For some years he has also discussed poetry on Radio NZ National Nights. He has been a participant in national festivals, both as speaker, tutor and chair. He currently teaches part time at Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology. He lives near Motueka, in the upper South Island.

Cliff is at the final stages of a new collection of poems.

 

Links

New Zealand Book Council profile page

Victoria University Press author page

Twitter:@FellCliff

Bibliography: Cliff Fell

 

Poetry

The Good Husbandwoman’s Alphabet (Last Leaf Press, 2014)

Beauty of the Badlands  (Victoria UP, 2008)

The Adulterer’s Bible  (Victoria UP, 2003)

'Novels stand outside time, with their narrative structure of beginning, middle and end. They outlast politics, which are by nature ephemeral, swift and changeable and can quickly become invisible, detectable only to the skilled eye. ' - Fiona Farrell

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