Time Out Books: NZ Bestsellers

 

For the week ending 27 February 2022

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FICTION

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1. Greta & Valdin by Rebecca K.Reilly (VUP)

A second week at the top spot for this stylish comic debut, longlisted for the Ockham New Zealand Book Awards. The Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction is $60,000 this year, and Reilly wouldn’t be the first new writer to pull off the coup: see Becky Manawatu and Āue in 2020.

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 2. The Frog Prince by James Norcliffe (Penguin)

Norcliffe’s first novel for adults is a playful novel that explores the origins of a fairy tale and ‘lust and infatuation and love’ from the Grimm Brothers to contemporary Europe. Read Josie Shapiro’s full review here.
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3. In Amber’s Wake by Christine Leunens (Bateman)

This new novel from the author of Caging Skies—adapted into Taika Waititi’s film Jojo Rabbit—is set in 1980s’ Auckland, Cambridge and Antarctica, taking in the Springbok Tour, protests against nuclear testing in the Pacific, and the bombing of the Rainbow Warrior.
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4. Loop Tracks by Sue Orr (VUP)

Also longlisted for the Ockham NZ Book Awards, this novel encompasses the late 70s and contemporary lockdown Wellington. In Orr’s hands ‘the subtleties of familial and blood connections are complex, challenging and inspirational.’ Read Stephanie Johnson’s full review here.
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5. A Good Winter by Gigi Fenster (Text Publishing)

Another longlisted novel, and already a winner (of the 2020 Michael Gifkins Prize for an unpublished manuscript). A psychological thriller that explores trauma, obsession and jealousy.

 

 

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NONFICTION

 

 1. Shifting Grounds: Deep Histories of Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland by Lucy Mackintosh (BWB)

Number one for the past two months, this landmark book is onglisted in the Illustrated Nonfiction category at the Ockham NZ Book Awards. It’s an exploration of the cultural histories of three of Auckland’s most iconic landscapes: Pukekawa (the Domain), Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill) and the Ōtuataua Stonefields at Ihumātao.

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2. Bloody Woman by Lana Lopesi (BWB)

Longlisted in the General Nonfiction category of the Ockhams, this essay collection traverses the personal and political, feminism and the Samoan diaspora, and goddess of war Nafanua, described by Tusiata Avia as ‘the original blood clot.’

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3. Imagining Decolonisation by Biance Elkington, Moana Jackson, Rebecca Kiddle, Ocean Ripeka Mercier, Mike Ross, Jennie Smeaton, Amanda Thomas (BWB)

This landmark collection of essays was first published in May 2020, and almost two years on it’s essential reading on history, tikanga, law, politics, our Pacific relationships and envisaging the future.
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4. The Mirror Book by Charlotte Grimshaw (Vintage)

It’s unsurprising this sensational memoir is longlisted for the Ockhams (in General Nonfiction) this year. A ‘fascinating portrait of not only a family, but the writing process. How we magpie material (go and make a story out of it) and what we build from it and at whose expense?’ Read Rachael King’s full review here.
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5. Mauri Ora: Wisdom from the Māori World by Peter Alsop and Te Rau Kupenga (Potton & Burton)

First published in 2016, this bilingual collection of whakataukī (proverbs) grouped by theme and illustrated with the work of numerous different photographers is a visual stunner that continues to appeal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'Character to some extent is much a construction of the reader as it is of the writer.' - Lloyd Jones

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